FOCUS

The Moon slid through Earth's shadow on January 31, 2018 in a total lunar eclipse. In this time-lapse sequence of that eclipse from Portal, Arizona, USA, the partial eclipse starts with the Moon high in the western sky. 

01-16-2019
IC 342: The Hidden Galaxy

Similar in size to large, bright spiral galaxies in our neighborhood, IC 342 is a mere 10 million light-yearsdistant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night sky, but it is hidden from clear view and only glimpsed through the veil of stars, gas and dust clouds along the plane of our own Milky Way galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed and reddened by interveningcosmic clouds, this sharp telescopic image traces the galaxy's own obscuring dust, young star clusters, and glowing pink star forming regions along spiral arms that wind far from the galaxy's core. IC 342 may have undergone a recent burst of star formation activity and is close enough to have gravitationally influenced the evolution of the local group of galaxies and the Milky Way.

Image Credit & CopyrightArturas Medvedevas

Spitzer Space Telescope


01-15-2019
The Heart and Soul Nebulas

01-12-2019
Milky Way Falls

It can be the driest place on planet Earth, but water still flows in Chile's Atacama desert, high in the mountains. After discovering this small creek with running water, the photographer returned to the site to watch the Milky Way rise in the dark southern skies, calculating the moment when Milky Way and precious flowing water would meet. In the panoramic night skyscape, stars and nebulaeimmersed in the glow along the Milky Way itself also shared that moment with the Milky Way's satellite galaxies the Large and Small Magellanic clouds above the horizon at the right. Bright star Beta Centauri is poised at the very top of the waterfall. Above it lies the dark expanse of the Coalsack nebula and the stars of the Southern Cross.

Image Credit & CopyrightYuri Beletsky (Carnegie Las Campanas ObservatoryTWAN)


AT2018cow erupted in or near a galaxy known as CGCG 137-068, which is located about 200 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Hercules. The yellow cross shows the location of this puzzling outburst.

Credits: Sloan Digital Sky Survey



Partial Eclipse over Beijing

01-10-2019
Vela Supernova Remnant Mosaic

The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy runs through thiscomplex and beautiful skyscape. Seen toward colorful stars near the northwestern edge of the constellationVela (the Sails), the 16 degree wide, 200 frame mosaic is centered on the glowing filaments of the Vela Supernova Remnant, the expanding debris cloud from the death explosion of a massive star. Light from the supernova explosion that created the Vela remnant reached Earth about 11,000 years ago. In addition to the shocked filaments of glowing gas, the cosmic catastrophe also left behind an incredibly dense, rotating stellar core, the Vela Pulsar. Some 800 light-years distant, the Vela remnant is likely embedded in a larger and older supernova remnant, the Gum Nebula. Objects identified in this broad mosaic include emission and reflection nebulae, star clusters, and the remarkable Pencil Nebula.

Image Credit & CopyrightRobert GendlerRoberto ColombariDigitized Sky Survey (POSS II)


01-07-2019
Stars, Meteors, and a Comet in Taurus